A Local Civil Rights Movement and its Leaders

History Years 9-10

Key Questions

  • What is our local civil rights history?  Who were the key leaders?  What is it and their significance?
  • What role do we all have of protecting rights and freedoms?
  • Why did the government make the decisions it did when it came to rights?
  • Do (and have) all people experience rights and freedoms equally?

Learning Objectives

Knowledge – Students will be able to:

  • Explain how an Indigenous rights movement developed concerning key issues.    
  • Analyse the role of key individuals in the Indigenous rights movement.
  • Analyse and compare methods of achieving improvements in rights.

Skills – Students will be able to:

  • Analyse cause and effect and influence
  • Develop own perspectives and support with evidence
  • Interpret perspective
  • Interpret sources and images

Curriculum Links

Historial Knowledge

  • Causes of the struggle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for rights and freedoms before 1965 (VCHHK151)
  • Effects of methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the role of one individual or group in the struggle (VCHHK155)

Historical Concepts and Skills

  • Sequence significant events in chronological order to support analysis of the causes and effects of these events and identify the changes they brought about (VCHHC121);
  • Analyse the different perspectives of people in the past and evaluate how these perspectives are influenced by significant events, ideas, location, beliefs and values (VCHHC124);
  • Analyse the long term causes, short term triggers and the intended and unintended effects of significant events and developments (VCHHC127); and
  • Evaluate the historical significance of an event, idea, individual or place (VCHHC128)

Intercultural Capability 

  • Analyse the ways in which intercultural relationships and experiences have contributed to the development of attitudes, beliefs and behaviours, and how they are manifested in various contexts (VCICCB018)
  • Analyse the components of a cohesive society, and the challenges, benefits and consequences of maintaining or failing to maintain that cohesion (VCICCD020)

Key Local Knowledge Featured in this Unit

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Cummeragunja Mission

It is of significant value to take students on a field trip to Cummeragunja Mission, for a guided tour by Parks Victoria, if you have the time.  The relevant details are included within the Unit Plan.

This is relevant to Lesson 3 of the proposed sequence of lessons.

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The Flats

It is highly recommended that you take students to The Flats, which is on the land between Shepparton and Mooroopna.  The relevant details are included within the Unit Plan.

This is relevant to Lesson 5 in the sequences of lessons.

The Flats DVD is also a significant local resource that contains oral histories of elders who lived on this significant site.  Details on the DVD are included within the Unit Plan.

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First Australians

Episode 6 of this landmark series focuses upon important aspects of our local history, and key individuals as part of this.

The series can be accesses through Youtube, through the First Australians website, and on DVD.  

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Uncle William Cooper

Uncle William is a significant national figure, and a civil rights leaders, who was born and raised on Cummeragunja Mission.  

A range of information is available on Uncle William Cooper, identified within the Unit Plan.

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Sir Doug Nicholls

Sir Doug is a further significant national figure born and raised on Cummeragunja Mission.  He went on to be Governor of South Australia.

A range of information is available on Sir Doug Nicholls, identified within the Unit Plan.  

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Uncle Jack Patten

Uncle Jack is another significant national figure born and raised on Cummeragunja Mission, as well as being an important civil rights leader.  

A range of information is available on Uncle Jack Patten, identified within the Unit Plan.